Open sessions > S.10 – Traditional Landscapes: Exploring the Connections between Landscape, Identity, Heritage, and Change

Authors can submit papers directly on PESCRL website by April 9 (section: 'Submit a communication'). Submission requires a title, a 2,000 signs abstract, 5 keywords as well as one contact information and the institutional attachment of all authors. Abstracts and presentations should be made in English. The abstracts will be fully refereed by the program committee and the accepted ones will notified by April 24. Some sessions might require full papers before PESCRL event in September.

S.10 – Traditional Landscapes: Exploring the Connections between Landscape, Identity, Heritage, and Change

Chair – Zdeněk KučeraCharles University, Faculty of Science; Alexandra Kruse, EUCALAND. Hans Renes, Utrecht University, Faculty of Geosciences. Csaba Centeri, Szent István University, Faculty of Environmental and Agricultural Sciences

Abstract: The aim of the session is to discuss (the concept of) traditional landscapes, their ambiguous nature and connections to contemporary landscape research and practice. Particular attention will be given to connections of traditional landscapes with the themes of identities, landscape transformations, landscape management and heritage.

Within cultural landscape research, much attention has been given to unique historical, environmental, economic, social and cultural conditions which have contributed to the development of specific forms of landscapes and their management. A prominent position in these discussions is occupied by so-called traditional or historical landscapes which are in particular believed to be: rather stable and slow developing; of pre-modern origin; showing unique examples of historical continuity of local landscape forms as well as practices; rare and preserved in marginal locations. Although such a notion of traditional landscapes may be criticised from different perspectives, especially for not considering the importance of change for formation and recognition of specific meanings and values bounded with local landscapes and heritages (see e.g., Renes 2015; DeSilvey 2017), it may be argued as well that the ideas of traditional landscapes still contribute to the formation of present identities and that traditional landscapes are often referred to while promoting particular regions and communities, their products and heritages. In this sense, traditional landscapes may be viewed as constructed or invented, their present recognition being a result of particular perceptions and interpretations of local environments and their pasts. Traditional landscapes thus also (see Schein 2009, p.383): serve as a facilitator/mediator of particular social, cultural, economic, and political intentions and debates; contribute to normalization and reproduction of various social and cultural practices.

Hence, the key questions addressed by the session are:

  • What is meant by traditional landscapes? How are they recognized and what are their characteristics and functions? Are there any transformations acceptable in connection with traditional landscapes? Can transformations of present landscapes result in formation and recognition of new traditional landscapes?
  • What is the connection between traditional landscapes and authenticity? Do landscape protection and management and planning contribute to the sustainability of traditional landscapes and their heritages? Can they contribute to recognition of new ones?
  • What are the meanings and values of traditional landscapes? Are traditional landscapes important for identity formation across various geographical scales? How and why? And what is the role of local products in sustaining traditional landscapes, authentic regional cultures, and their identities?

Both more general and conceptual contributions as well as case studies are welcomed. The session is organized by the Institute for Research on European Agricultural Landscapes e.V. (EUCALAND) in cooperation with the Historical Geography Research Centre, Charles University, Faculty of Science, Prague, Czechia.

The session is organized by the Institute for Research on European Agricultural Landscapes e.V. (EUCALAND) in cooperation with the Historical Geography Research Centre, Charles University, Faculty of Science, Prague, Czechia. EUCALAND is an expert network that deals with the cultural and agricultural landscapes of Europe, promotes their consideration and preservation of their heritage. This session follows on from the organization of successful EUCALAND special sessions at the PECSRL meetings in Óbidos (2008), Riga/Liepaja (2010), Leeuwarden (2012), Gothenburg (2014) and Innsbruck/Seefeld (2016).

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